ReelTalk Movie Reviews  


New Reviews
Determined: The Story...
Never Rarely Sometime...
I Still Believe
Lost Girls
Greed
Guilty
Onward
Way Back, The
more movies...
New Features
Score Season #50
The Screenwriter's Notebook
Muse of the Movies: Mary Pickford
more features...
Navigation
ReelTalk Home Page
Movies
Features
Forum
Search
Contests
Customize
Contact Us
Affiliates
Advertise on ReelTalk

Listen to Movie Addict Headquarters on internet talk radio Add to iTunes

Buy a copy of Confessions of a Movie Addict



Main Page Movies Features Log In/Manage


Rate This Movie
 ExcellentExcellentExcellentExcellentExcellent
 Above AverageAbove AverageAbove AverageAbove Average
 AverageAverageAverage
 Below AverageBelow Average
 Poor
Rated 2.62 stars
by 53 people


ReelTalk Movie Reviews
A Light Noir
by Richard Jack Smith

Where He Walked by Night was conservative, occasionally icy and suspenseful, The Big Combo takes a more relaxed approach. Jean Wallace -- the wife of co-star Cornel Wilde -- looks lovely, yet her role in this light noir offers few opportunities for development. Itís the ultimate mouse-trap of a performance, the kind which lingers in apathy without any hope for escape. 

Meanwhile, Richard Conteís Mr. Brown steals the picture effortlessly. His Savile Row presentation reaches its apex with the quintessential line: ďFirst is first, and second is nobody.Ē These words convey a reckless disregard for others in business and commerce. 

Overworked cop Leonard Diamond (Wilde) has stretched department resources to the breaking point in an effort to trap Mr. Brown (Conte). He also cares deeply for Susan Lowell (Wallace), a former piano hopeful, who canít escape the crime lordís ever tightening grip.

The filmís architecture serves only one master: John Alton. A cinematographer with a gift for black and white, he leaves his fingerprints all over The Big Combo. For example, one shot of a piano player echoes the style of great jazz photography from the 1950s.  

Although He Walked by Night features better camerawork and storytelling, thereís enough style within The Big Combo to make up the difference.

(Released by United Artists Pictures; not rated by MMPA.)


                                                                                                                                                                               
 
© 2020 - ReelTalk Movie Reviews
Website designed by Dot Pitch Studios, LLC