ReelTalk Movie Reviews  


New Reviews
Determined: The Story...
Never Rarely Sometime...
Uncorked (2020)
Hunt, The
I Still Believe
Lost Girls
Greed
Guilty
more movies...
New Features
Tribute to Easter Parade
Funny Film Ladies Sing Fun Songs
Score Season #50
more features...
Navigation
ReelTalk Home Page
Movies
Features
Forum
Search
Contests
Customize
Contact Us
Affiliates
Advertise on ReelTalk

Listen to Movie Addict Headquarters on internet talk radio Add to iTunes

Buy a copy of Confessions of a Movie Addict



Main Page Movies Features Log In/Manage


Rate This Movie
 ExcellentExcellentExcellentExcellentExcellent
 Above AverageAbove AverageAbove AverageAbove Average
 AverageAverageAverage
 Below AverageBelow Average
 Poor
Rated 3.23 stars
by 95 people


ReelTalk Movie Reviews
A Grand Pursuit
by Richard Jack Smith

Ralph Fiennes continues to fascinate me. When I saw him in The English Patient, there was a lingering dullness to his screen presence which took a long time to shake. For The Grand Budapest Hotel, he has achieved a more spontaneous edge, often reminding us of comedic masterminds from the 1960s, such as Peter Sellers and Zero Mostel.

Wes Anderson’s original comedy depicts everything from the clockwork operation of a hotel to the central murder mystery involving concierge Gustave (Fiennes). It’s a spiral staircase of elegant art direction, designed to put a bun in the oven of cinematic impotence. If genius can be measured by laughter or innovation, then Anderson has arrived at a perfect style to suit his blossoming talents. 

Fiennes becomes a major player to the extent that talk of Oscars can seem somewhat clichéd. He’s completely in charge of technique and improvisation, while carrying the self-confidence to make it look effortless. Smaller roles occupied by F. Murray Abraham, Bill Murray and Jeff Goldblum add dashes of brilliance to this well-crafted milieu.

Overall, there’s not a single echo of traditional storytelling to be found in The Grand Budapest Hotel. Scenes run into each other like dominoes on a smooth surface. The story forms its own internal logic based on chance meetings, turns of phrase and fleeting bursts of activity. I highly recommend this film as an example of Anderson’s idiosyncratic gifts for storytelling.

(Released by Fox Searchlight and rated "R" by MPAA.)


                                                                                                                                                                               
 
© 2020 - ReelTalk Movie Reviews
Website designed by Dot Pitch Studios, LLC